Archive | management by walking around

Rewarding Teamwork

I believe every manager is a member of three teams: The people that report to that manager.  This is usually what someone means when they refer to “my team.” The external stakeholders in other departments they work with every day. For example, marketing is often considered part of the extended team for sales or development….

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Sculley on Jobs

Leander Kahney, editor and publisher of Cult of Mac and author of the New York Times bestseller Inside Steve’s Brain, provides a fascinating interview about Steve Jobs from John Sculley, former CEO of Apple.  It’s amazingly frank; among other things, Sculley suggests it was a “big mistake” to hire him to run the company when…

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Healthy blog!

MBWA stats for 2010

WordPress.com provides a wide variety of statistics that help you understand the health of your blog.  Like most metrics, the WP statistics are one part useful and one part entertainment.  To reinforce both of these attributes, earlier this month WP sent an email with their take on my blog.    I’ve borrowed from their email but sprinkled in…

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Culture eats strategy for breakfast

A little more than six months ago, I took a new role with a group that was described as in need of a “turn-around” and an “updated strategy and direction”. I was urged to introduce a new mission/vision, strategic objectives, and revised key performance indicators. Given my performance management background, this seemed like a reasonable…

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Scaling MBWA

A few years ago, I wrote a blog post that pointed out that the benefits of management by walking around can be achieved without actually leaving your desk.  Some examples are as follows: Management can mimic the shopping experience of a prospective customer by visiting a Web site and trying to find/buy a particular product….

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The Downside of Downsizing

I recently took a “Managing With Influence” class from Jeffrey Pfeffer, professor of organizational behavior at Stanford University, and author of a book subtitled “Profiting from Evidence-Based Management.” During the class, Professor Pfeffer claimed that layoffs do not improve financial performance, except in the very short run.  He based this on a careful analysis of multiple…

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