Manage By Walking Around http://jonathanbecher.com Aligning Execution With Strategy Mon, 20 Oct 2014 17:07:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 The Kardashian Index http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/10/19/kardashian-index/ http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/10/19/kardashian-index/#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 03:17:31 +0000 http://jonathanbecher.com/?p=4596 I am concerned that phenomena similar to that of Kim Kardashian may also exist in the scientific community. I think it is possible that there are individuals who are famous for being famous. Writing in Genome Biology, Professor Neil Hall of the University of Liverpool suggests that too many researchers get invited to present at...

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I am concerned that phenomena similar to that of Kim Kardashian may also exist in the scientific community. I think it is possible that there are individuals who are famous for being famous.

Writing in Genome Biology, Professor Neil Hall of the University of Liverpool suggests that too many researchers get invited to present at scientific conferences due to their public profile, rather than their academic standing. To help quantify this potential disconnect, Hall compares the number of followers a research scientist has on twitter with the number of citations they have for their peer-reviewed work. The ratio of the two measures is called the ‘Kardashian Index’:

The kardashian Index

If your number of twitter followers is more than 5X your citations, you’re an academic Kardashian; presumably famous for no good reason. In Hall’s words,

In an age dominated by the cult of celebrity we, as scientists, need to protect ourselves from mindlessly lauding shallow popularity and take an informed and critical view of the value we place on the opinion of our peers.

If your Kardashian index gets above 5, then it’s time to get off Twitter and write those papers.

We all know people who flaunt their social credentials (# followers on Twitter, # friends/likes on Facebook) but I think Hall’s suggestion trivializes the situation. Executed properly, social media breaks down barriers to information by giving people access to information they might not have otherwise. Social media encourages discussions on a wide range of topics. This can be equally true in business and in university research.

In my opinion, neuroscientist Micha Allen gets it right:

While a (sorta) funny joke, […] we (the Kardashians) are democratizing science. We are filtering the literally unending deluge of papers to try and find the most outrageous, the most interesting, and the most forgotten, so that they can see the light of day beyond wherever they were published and forgotten. We seek these papers to generate discussion and to garner attention where it is needed most.

Social media has fundamentally changed the disciplines of marketing and communications, and I suspect it will also change academia. Eventually academics might be rewarded both for publications placed in traditional journals and for having a measurable impact through social media. Like all changes, it’s both scary and a huge opportunity.

A note to my academic friends: You don’t have to keep up with the Kardashians, but don’t ignore social media.

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I’m Listening: Engage an Audience of One http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/10/14/im-listening-engage-audience-one/ http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/10/14/im-listening-engage-audience-one/#comments Tue, 14 Oct 2014 17:43:16 +0000 http://jonathanbecher.com/?p=4577 Along with 70,000 fans, I recently watched my San Francisco 49’ers defeat a tough Chiefs team in Levi’s Stadium. Amid the din of the stadium, the cheers and boos, I foolishly tried having a conversation with a friend. Despite my best efforts to maintain a conversation, I was no match for Colin Kaepernick, stadium music,...

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The Customer EdgeAlong with 70,000 fans, I recently watched my San Francisco 49’ers defeat a tough Chiefs team in Levi’s Stadium. Amid the din of the stadium, the cheers and boos, I foolishly tried having a conversation with a friend. Despite my best efforts to maintain a conversation, I was no match for Colin Kaepernick, stadium music, and thousands of screaming fans. More than ever, every day we are in a similar fight for attention. It’s no fun trying to have a conversation, much less forge a relationship, when you are competing with the din.

Now imagine the opposite scenario. You might be in a crowded place but you are having a meaningful and focused conversation. Your friend is listening, closely, only to you. They may have a hundred of decisions to make or a calendar full of appointments – but none of that is intruding on this moment. Being the focus of someone’s attention is truly rare and powerful. It feels really good..

That’s the same feeling you want your customers to have. You want them to feel that their needs understood and fulfilled during every interaction with your company. Your customers must be an audience of one, where every part of your company is focused on their needs, their desires, and their successes. And if their experience is supported by products and services that map to their needs and contribute significantly to their successes, why would they turn to anyone else?

For large companies, and even small ones, this can be easier said than done. So how do you create this type of personal, attentive relationship between you and your customer? There’s no single answer to that question because every company faces challenges on multiple levels.

You need to understand your customers’ needs at a deep level. Gaining that insight may require information from a wide range of sources. Some of it you may have; some of it you may not. Some information may be public; other information may not be. Some of it may come from wholly new sources, such as Apple’s new watch, and your customers may willingly share that with you if it will help you meet their needs.

You need a way to make sense of all that information. You may have mountains of data, and you need a way to climb that mountain quickly and efficiently. Your products and services must be tuned and delivered with this mountain of information in mind. There’s a wide range of systems and processes that may be involved in this, but end-to-end flexibility and efficiency should be your guiding principles.

You need to engage consistently. You need to enable your customer to experience that same feeling of connectedness and of being understood no matter where or how they come into contact with your company. What your sales representatives know about a customer’s needs is knowledge that should be accessible to your customer service and call center representatives in real time. Whether your customers interact with you over the web, in a retail store, or via any other channel, you need to convey the same singularity of focus and the same profound understanding of their needs. Enable that understanding and focus to permeate all your channels, and you will be able to engage your customer consistently and in a way that can strengthen your relationship every time.

Remember how great it feels to be the center of someone’s attention? That’s what it feels like to be an audience of one. That’s your point of reference for an extraordinary customer experience..

Now go pay it forward to your customers.

This article was originally posted on The Customer Edge, a new webzine for leaders in customer service, marketing, sales, and commerce.

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18 Minutes to Higher Productivity http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/10/12/18-minutes-to-higher-productivity/ http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/10/12/18-minutes-to-higher-productivity/#comments Sun, 12 Oct 2014 08:09:22 +0000 http://jonathanbecher.com/?p=4567 A few weeks ago I read “18 Minutes: Find Your Focus, Master Distraction, and Get the Right Things Done” by Peter Bregman. 18 Minutes is a business self-help entertaining book based on his blog and weekly Harvard Business Review columns. The book suggests a process for prioritizing your day in 18 minutes over a nine-hour...

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18 MinutesA few weeks ago I read “18 Minutes: Find Your Focus, Master Distraction, and Get the Right Things Done” by Peter Bregman. 18 Minutes is a business self-help entertaining book based on his blog and weekly Harvard Business Review columns. The book suggests a process for prioritizing your day in 18 minutes over a nine-hour workday.

As I was reading the book, I was struck by a number of quotes that resonated with my own philosophy:

Bregman’s advice: “The world doesn’t reward perfection; it rewards productivity.”
My version: Good enough is good enough

Bregman’s advice: “Don’t settle for imperfection. Shoot for it.”
My version: Failure is the new black

Bregman’s advice: “Don’t be paralyzed by an uncertain future. Just keep moving.”
My version:  Change is the only constant

All of this is great advice but the core of the book is how to better manage your time and avoid things that are not productive. Bregman provides an approach that can be easily implemented. When someone comes to you with a request, ask three simple questions before you accept any commitment:

  1. Am I the right person?
  2. Is this the right time?
  3. Do I have enough information?

Unless the answer to all three of the questions is yes, then you should say no to the request.

I’ve been trying out the approach and it’s been an incredibly useful way to prioritize meeting requests and the flood of email. At first, saying no more often felt like I was being less helpful than I could be. But I realized that the most helpful thing I could do was to prioritize my time on the highest impact activities.

As a result, I created a slightly modified approach:

  1. If I’m not the right person, I pass the request on to someone who is.
  2. If this isn’t the right time, I schedule it for when it will be.
  3. And, if I don’t have enough information, I ask someone to track down more details.

It’s not a perfect system but, as Bregman points out, it helps me “resist the temptation to say yes too often.”

Don’t resist the temptation to follow me on twitter @jbecher

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Gladwell vs Vonnegut on Change Specialists http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/10/08/change-specialists/ http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/10/08/change-specialists/#comments Thu, 09 Oct 2014 02:43:58 +0000 http://jonathanbecher.com/?p=4547 You say you want a revolution Well, you know We all want to change the world Many readers will recognize these lines as the opening to the Beatles’ 1968 song Revolution. More than just a catchy tune, the song is notable because it was the first time the Beatles expressed political views so publicly. We...

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Beatles RevolutionYou say you want a revolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world

Many readers will recognize these lines as the opening to the Beatles’ 1968 song Revolution. More than just a catchy tune, the song is notable because it was the first time the Beatles expressed political views so publicly.

We might all want to change the world but we know that change is hard. In Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell’s “Law of the Few” claims the success of a social epidemic is heavily dependent on three types of people:

  • Mavens, experts who continuously learn more and yearn to share their knowledge.
  • Connectors, people who have incredibly widespread and impactful social networks.
  • Salesmen, specialists in persuasion who can make ideas simpler and more attractive.

Tipping Point is a fascinating read and quickly became a bestseller when it was published in 2010.  However, Gladwell has not been immune to controversy from people who claim his “pop science” ignores evidence that might detract from his stories.

Recently, while reading Bluebeard by Kurt Vonnegut, I began to wonder whether The Law of the Few was even an original concept. Here’s an excerpt from Vonnegut’s 1987 book:

Slazinger claims to have learned from history that most people cannot open their minds to new ideas unless a mind-opening team with a peculiar membership goes to work on them. The team must consist of three sorts of specialists, he says.

The rarest of these specialists, he says, is an authentic genius — a person capable of having seemingly good ideas not in general circulation.

The second sort of specialist is […] a highly intelligent citizen in good standing in his or her community, who understands and admires the fresh ideas of the genius, and who testifies that the genius is far from mad.

The third sort of specialist is a person who can explain everything, no matter how complicated, to the satisfaction of most people, no matter how stupid or pigheaded they may be.

He says that if you can’t get a cast like that together, you can forget changing anything in a great big way.

Don’t those change specialists sound eerily similar to Gladwell’s maven, connector, and salesman?

Given Vonnegut’s popularity, it’s likely that Gladwell read Bluebeard well before he wrote Tipping Point. Of course, it’s impossible to know whether it influenced Gladwell’s writing or not. The similarity could be coincidental.

In other words, this a classic case of correlation vs cause. We might need mavens, connectors, and salesmen to pull off a successful revolution but having them doesn’t guarantee change will happen.

It does, however, make for an entertaining story.

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Keep an Open Mind http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/09/30/keep-open-mind/ http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/09/30/keep-open-mind/#comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 22:05:08 +0000 http://jonathanbecher.com/?p=4535 Keep an open mind but not so open that your brain falls out. As part of a recent talk around creating a culture of innovation, I included this quote which is commonly attributed to physicist Richard Feynman. After the talk, a reporter asked me for the source of the quote to use in an article....

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Open MindKeep an open mind but not so open that your brain falls out.

As part of a recent talk around creating a culture of innovation, I included this quote which is commonly attributed to physicist Richard Feynman. After the talk, a reporter asked me for the source of the quote to use in an article. Since I wasn’t sure, I spent some time researching and discovered that, like many famous quotes, the origin is unclear.

The earliest related mention I could find was in an 1866 speech that Sir Edward Clarke delivered to the U.K. House of Commons:

The mind was indeed so open that it had nothing in it at all.

However, this quote doesn’t include the memorable portion of the brain falling out. That phrase shows up in a 1937 article in The Yale Law Journal:

They have a number of bitterly satirical comments on persons whose minds are so open that their brains fall out.

For those who prefer a more exact match, the January 27, 1940 edition of the Blytheville Courier News reported that Professor Walter Kotschnig told Holyoke College students to keep their minds open: “but not so open that your brains fall out.”

Regardless of the original source, the spirit of the quote is powerful: if you want to create change, you have to challenge your own deeply-held assumptions. But don’t forget common sense.

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Great Leaders Think Simply http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/09/22/great-leaders-think-simply/ http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/09/22/great-leaders-think-simply/#comments Mon, 22 Sep 2014 15:54:07 +0000 http://jonathanbecher.com/?p=4474 Those of us who are privileged to be leaders understand how difficult it is to lead people. Not assets, not resources. People. Early in my career, I spent a lot of time thinking about what it meant to be a leader. I talked to more seasoned leaders, I read books on management theory, and –...

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Those of us who are privileged to be leaders understand how difficult it is to lead people.

Not assets, not resources. People.

Early in my career, I spent a lot of time thinking about what it meant to be a leader. I talked to more seasoned leaders, I read books on management theory, and – most importantly – I asked the people reporting to me. I quickly realized there was no cookie-cutter approach to leadership. Each person has unique aspirations, skills, and deficiencies. And my success was contingent on their success.

Over time I developed my own leadership mantra, manage by walking around, which is also the name of my personal website. The phrase comes from a management style at HP in the 1970’s; though some believe the first person to truly manage by walking around was Abraham Lincoln.

In 2009, in an attempt to simplify the views on leadership that I developed during my three tenures as a CEO, I finally wrote down My Management Guidelines: focus on outcomes, reward people for results, and let people do their jobs.

Re-reading these five years later, I’m struck that my guidelines still hold true. But I think they are missing something; a unifying theme.

Great leaders are able to find the signal from within the noise. Great leaders concentrate on the important not just the urgent. Great leaders think simply.

Let me illustrate what thinking simply looks like, and how it can help you become a better leader. As they say, show, don’t tell.

Leadership principle 1: Focus on outcomes, not activities

What this means
Tracking an activity is akin to measuring what I call an ‘ego metric:’ website page views, Twitter followers, Facebook likes, etc. When we focus on the outcome, we remind ourselves the point of the activity in the first place. And if a specific activity isn’t contributing to the desired outcome, we should course correct to something that will.

Think Simply illustration
Which is a more meaningful metric: the number of people who attended a company event, or the number of people who attended the event and later purchased your product? As a CMO, I believe in running a marketing organization as a business which means the outcome is more important than the activity.

Great leaders think simply about focusing on meaningful outcomes. And they know how to ask the right questions to figure out which outcomes are meaningful.

Leadership principle 2: Reward people for a focus on results

What this means
As naturally follows from a focus on the right outcomes, I don’t like to reward people for trying hard if they were working on the wrong things. I prefer to catch people doing the right things and provide them with instantaneous feedback.

Think Simply illustration
At my last job, I handed out ‘Becher bucks’ to reinforce behavior (better exchange rate than Schrute bucks), but there are many ways to reward employees that aren’t financial. Motivated people are likely to replicate the behavior (in this case, focusing on the outcome and not the activity). This can scale beyond real-time feedback to building KPIs that promote the right set of behaviors and create the right results.

Great leaders think simply about rewards as a way to align their peoples’ goals with that of the company.

Leadership principle 3: Hire good people and let them do their jobs

What this means
I want my employees to be able to do their job better than I can do it myself. If I think and act like I can do it better than they can, I don’t really need them around.

Think Simply illustration
Remember why you hired someone in the first place. In the midst of an important deadline or project, we sometimes forget what our team’s strengths and weaknesses are. As a leader, you must be confident in your ability to evaluate your people. And if you aren’t, then don’t worry, this comes with practice and experience. Parlay the confidence in yourself into confidence in your team – if you were impressed enough to bring him or her aboard, then you should be confident in their ability to excel.

Great leaders think simply about their peoples’ abilities to do their jobs.

Leaders – has simple thinking ever helped your career?

Photo: Emilia Tjernström/Flickr

This article originally appeared on LinkedIn on September 15, 2014.

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Blue Juice, Tarmac, and Other Air Travel Slang http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/09/14/air-travel-slang/ http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/09/14/air-travel-slang/#comments Sun, 14 Sep 2014 21:21:11 +0000 http://jonathanbecher.com/?p=4448 We’re still sitting on the tarmac… Given how much I travel, I’ve used that phrase countless times over the last several years but never thought much about the word tarmac. It turns out it’s short for tarmacadam, or tar-penetration macadam. Macadam is named for John Loudon McAdam who invented an effective and economical road construction method...

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Cracked TarmacWe’re still sitting on the tarmac…

Given how much I travel, I’ve used that phrase countless times over the last several years but never thought much about the word tarmac. It turns out it’s short for tarmacadam, or tar-penetration macadam.

Macadam is named for John Loudon McAdam who invented an effective and economical road construction method in the early 1800’s based on crushed rock. These roads worked well for horses and carriages but weren’t suitable for higher-speed cars and their rubber tires. The jagged rocks often caused flat tires and, when it rained, roads eroded and became difficult to drive on.

100 years later, Edgar Purnell Hooley improved on the long-standing process by mixing the crushed rock with heated tar and slag. This mixture could form a smooth surface more suitable for cars. Hooley’s patented tarmac quickly became a world-wide standard for roads.

Over time people started to refer to any sort of asphalt or blacktop as tarmac. The term persists, especially for the paved areas at airports, even though the material is rarely used anymore. Ironically, real tarmac isn’t a suitable surface for an airport. Tarmac softens in hot weather which would likely cause a heavy airplane to sink into it.

Having solved the mystery of tarmac, I decided to investigate other unusual words associated with air travel. Here’s what I learned:

APRON: The section of the tarmac that is not a runway or taxiway; this is whether planes park or are serviced.

CONTRAIL: Short for condensation trails, these are the long, thin clouds that form behind aircraft; most often triggered by the water vapor in engine exhaust.

DEADHEADING: A pilot or flight attendant who flies free of charge because they are currently in the wrong city for their next scheduled flight.

IFR: Stands for instrument flight rules, the standard process for flying planes at altitude via electronic instruments when visual clues are not sufficient by themselves.

JUMPSEAT: The fold-up chairs most commonly used by the flight attendants, especially during takeoff and landing. These are officially known as auxiliary crew stations.

Oh, and one more thing. If a mischievous flight attendant offers you a blue juice cocktail, I wouldn’t drink it. Blue juice refers to the lavatory water.

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The Science of Social Selling http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/09/07/science-social-selling/ http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/09/07/science-social-selling/#comments Mon, 08 Sep 2014 01:49:04 +0000 http://jonathanbecher.com/?p=4419 Social selling is one of the hottest buzzwords in the technology market. Unfortunately, social selling is usually misunderstood as navigating the sales process using only tools like Twitter, Linkedin, or Facebook. While technology can help, social selling is about building stronger relationships with potential buyers, based on an authentic sense of empathy and a deep...

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Social MediaSocial selling is one of the hottest buzzwords in the technology market. Unfortunately, social selling is usually misunderstood as navigating the sales process using only tools like Twitter, Linkedin, or Facebook. While technology can help, social selling is about building stronger relationships with potential buyers, based on an authentic sense of empathy and a deep understanding of the problems they face.

Even if they don’t use social technology, good salespeople already know that creating a connection with the client is essential for success. In real life (IRL for social types), connections are usually made on some common value or some shared demographic. This is why salespeople spend so much time establishing a personal relationship, not just selling their product.

Researchers from the University of British Columbia have shown that incidental similarities between a buyer and seller are enough to establish a personal connection and increase the likelihood to purchase. Incidental similarities include a wide range of events: a shared first name, birthday or birthplace. In the words of one of the professors:

Those incidental similarities can actually shape the situation in terms of your desire to buy and associate with the product or company, your attitude toward the product. It overflows onto the purchase experience — even though, rationally, it really shouldn’t.

Incidental similarities create a sense of connection even though they are superficial and common. Yes, common. For example, in a group of 23 people, the chance two people have the same birthday is greater than 50%. Many companies already exploit this opportunity:

Employees at Disney theme parks and Hilton Hotels wear name tags emblazoned with their hometowns, the researchers note, and many fitness centres display detailed biographies of their personal trainers, right down to the high school they attended.

Social technology can be used to discover the incidental similarities. So, if a sales rep points out he roots for the same sports team as you do, it’s probably not an accident. And chances are you’ll spend more than you originally expected.

That’s the science of social selling.

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The Unwritten Rules of Management http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/08/31/unwritten-rules-management/ http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/08/31/unwritten-rules-management/#comments Sun, 31 Aug 2014 21:37:36 +0000 http://jonathanbecher.com/?p=4401 You can’t polish a sneaker I was 30 mins into an incredibly boring presentation when that phrase caught my attention. It’s catchy, I thought, but what the heck does it mean? A little Internet sleuthing unearthed that the line is from the Unwritten Rules of Management, by William Swanson, former Chairman and CEO of Raytheon. Apparently,...

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Unwritten RulesYou can’t polish a sneaker

I was 30 mins into an incredibly boring presentation when that phrase caught my attention. It’s catchy, I thought, but what the heck does it mean?

A little Internet sleuthing unearthed that the line is from the Unwritten Rules of Management, by William Swanson, former Chairman and CEO of Raytheon. Apparently, when Swanson was growing up, he and his friends tried to polish their old sneakers to make them look new but, no matter how hard they tried, they couldn’t disguise the wear and tear. Translated into business speak: don’t waste effort putting the finishing touches on something that has little substance to begin with.

It’s good advice from a book that contains lots of other useful aphorisms including:

  • Beg for the bad news
  • Don’t be known as a good starter but a poor finisher
  • If you are not criticized, you may not be doing much
  • Treat the name of your company as if it were your own
  • It is easier to get into something than it is to get out of it

In 2005 when these 32 principles first came to light, they were so compelling they were called the CEO’s Secret Handbook. Unfortunately, it was later discovered that many of these were already included in the 1944 book, The Unwritten Laws of Engineering by W. J. King.

Despite the controversy, there’s plenty of useful advice. Some of my favorites include:

  1. Look for what is missing. Many know how to improve what’s there, but few can see what isn’t there.
  2. Practice shows that those who speak the most knowingly and confidently often end up with the assignment to get the job done.
  3. You remember 1/3 of what you read, 1/2 of what people tell you, but 100% of what you feel.
  4. Work for a boss to whom you can tell it like it is. Remember that you can’t pick your relatives, but you can pick your boss.
  5. However menial and trivial your early assignments may appear, give them your best efforts.

If there’s one single piece of advice worth following, it’s this one:

A person who is nice to you but rude to the waiter is not a nice person

It’s the most accurate test I know of to determine whether you should hire someone. And a great way to follow the no-asshole rule.

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An Aerospace Engineer’s Guide to Winning Tennis http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/08/17/aerospace-engineers-guide-winning-tennis/ http://jonathanbecher.com/2014/08/17/aerospace-engineers-guide-winning-tennis/#comments Mon, 18 Aug 2014 04:04:17 +0000 http://jonathanbecher.com/?p=4372 Simon “Si” Ramo is a remarkable person. Ramo is a world-renowned scientist and engineer. He was the chief architect of the US intercontinental ballistic missile system. He was the ‘R’ in TRW, the multibillion-dollar aerospace company now part of Northrop Grumman. And last year, at the age of 100, he became the oldest person to be...

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Extraordinary TennisSimon “Si” Ramo is a remarkable person.

Ramo is a world-renowned scientist and engineer. He was the chief architect of the US intercontinental ballistic missile system. He was the ‘R’ in TRW, the multibillion-dollar aerospace company now part of Northrop Grumman. And last year, at the age of 100, he became the oldest person to be awarded a patent.

As remarkable as all of that is, his insight into tennis – and perhaps all sports – might be even more remarkable. Ramo authored two books, Tennis By Machiavelli and Extraordinary Tennis Ordinary Players, which showed that tennis is played completely differently by professionals and amateurs. Of course, both types of players use the same rules and scoring. Sometimes they even use the same equipment. However, there is a fundamental difference: professionals win points whereas amateurs lose them.

In a professional game, players – nearly equal in skill – rally the ball back and forth until one of them hits the ball just beyond the reach of the opponent. Rallies are long and it’s literally a game of inches. On the other hand, rallies are short in an amateur game. Many balls are hit into the net or out of bounds. Double faults are more common than aces.

Ramo discovered this effect by ignoring conventional tennis scores (Love, Fifteen All, etc.) and examining individual points. In expert tennis, 80% of points are won while in amateur tennis, 80% are lost. Charles Ellis, the renowned investment consultant, explained that avoiding mistakes is the way to win a “Loser’s Game” – in amateur tennis and investing. The professional game is generally determined by the actions of the winner and the amateur game by the actions of the loser.

As an amateur, once you know this insight, your strategy is clear. Be conservative and keep the ball in play. Don’t try to win points. Let your opponent lose them. Since he’s an amateur, your opponent will play a losing game and not know it.

As Ramo said, “tennis players, as they slow down, must smarten up.”

 

 

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