Tag Archives | postaweek2013

Disruptive Persuasion

Remember the ‘but you are free’ technique? When you ask someone to do something, be sure to include the statement that they are free to choose to do it or not.  Adding this phrase doubles the likelihood they will do it. Davis and Knowles demonstrated another simple persuasion method which they dubbed the disrupt-then-reframe technique. …

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I Smell A Rat: Empathy In Business

In collaboration with author Gary Hamel and the Management Innovation Exchange (The MIX), SAP launched a crowd-source initiative which poses the question: What is the one thing you’d change to help organizations unleash and organize human potential across boundaries? As I was researching my own answer around the notion of “empathy in business”, I found a Washington Post article titled: A New Model…

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The Art and Science of Storytelling

As a marketer, I’m fascinated by both the art and science of storytelling. It’s no surprise the abstract for “When Consumers and Brands Talk: Storytelling Theory and Research in Psychology and Marketing” caught my eye: Storytelling is pervasive through life. Much information is stored, indexed, and retrieved in the form of stories. Although lectures tend…

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How Strategy Really Works

The 1993 HBR article ‘Customer Intimacy and Other Value Disciplines’ argued that every company had to become champions of one of three value disciplines — operational excellence, customer intimacy, or product leadership. Since that book was published, virtually every business meeting I’ve been in has used at least one of these phrases to describe strategy….

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Writing Better

I enjoy writing. I believe words matter. When I’m asked how I have time to write, I sometimes snidely answer “How do you have time to watch TV?”  I’ve shared writing advice from famous authors, including the very practical from George Orwell: If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out. and…

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Rethinking the way we learn

Last summer I read Daniel Willingham’s fascinating book ‘Why Don’t Students Like School?’ and immediately put it on my list to blog about. Willingham, a psychologist at the University of Virginia, applies the principles of cognitive psychology to the world of education. Essentially, his goal is explain to teachers how their students’ brains work. The…

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A Search For Cause

In college my statistics professor’s favorite expression was “correlation does not imply causation.” In case you’re not familiar with the phrase, I’ll borrow the explanation I learned in school: When male college students wake up with a headache, a large percentage of the time they are still wearing their shoes.  Therefore, sleeping with shoes on…

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